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PHP Mission

The mission of the Department of Population Health and Pathobiology is to recruit, train, inspire, and graduate Doctors of Veterinary Medicine of exemplary knowledge, skill, and character. In order to maintain the intellectual and professional climate necessary to accomplish this mission, the department's faculty will advance veterinary medical science through innovative basic and applied research, inspired mentoring of students (undergraduate, professional, residents, and graduate), excellence in clinical and diagnostic services, and innovative extension and engagement activities.

PHP Internal Site

 

Research

Click the photos to visit the laboratory pages

l Aquatic Epidemiology and Conservation Laboratory, Dr. Jay Levine, Chris Eads
The Aquatic Epidemiology and Conservation Laboratory (AECL) embraces the disciplines of aquatic animal epidemiology, conservation biology, ecology, microbial genetics, metabonomics and veterinary medicine to understandand preserve our natural aquatic heritage. Studies of the AECL team focus on assessing and monitoring habitat quality to understand and preserve aquatic resources. We integrate water chemistry, stable isotope analysis, the study of microbial communities,microbial source tracking, metabolic profiling,and veterinary diagnostics to examine biogeochemical and anthropogenic processes in freshwater ecosystems and their relationship to ecosystem, human and animal health. Our studies focus predominately on an imperiled group of freshwater bivalves, unionids (freshwater mussels) that serve as sensitive indicators of the health of aquatic communities.
b Borst Laboratory, Dr. Luke Borst, Mitsu Suyemoto
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Center for Chemical Toxicology Research and Phamacokinetics, Dr. Ronald Baynes, Jim Brooks

The CCTRP providesthe College and Universitya unique pool of faculty with expertise and training in comparative and quantitative pharmacology and toxicology.Center faculty focus on use of animal models to address research questions relevant to improving animal and human health as well as provide specific expertise in large animal medicine (food animal/equine) and aquatic species(fresh water and marine).The Center structure allows the dedicated efforts of diverse individuals to address critical needs of the College, University and livestock industry. For example, the Center's Food Animal and Residue Avoidance Database (FARAD) USDA project has contributed 31 years of research, teaching, and service to a national effort in drug and chemical food safety. The Center structure facilitates interaction of experts across a range of scientific/ medical/material/and statistical skills in order to perform translational research vital to human and veterinary medicine and our American livestock industry.

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Clinical Virology Laboratory, Dr. James Guy, Melissa Byrd, Leah Scarborough

The NCSU CVM Clinical Virology Laboratory provides virology diagnostic services to clients of the CVM Veterinary Health Complex, North Carolina veterinarians, and food animal industries located in North Carolina and surrounding states. The laboratory provides virologic testing services for a broad range of species; however, services are primarily oriented toward dogs, cats, horses, swine and poultry. The laboratory is a reference laboratory for detection of turkey coronavirus infection in turkeys (ELISA serology, PCR detection), and provides these services to producers in eight states. The laboratory also provides specialized services for diagnosis of chicken proventricular necrosis virus, the causative agent of transmissible viral proventriculitis in chickens.

b Comparative Immunology Research Laboratory, Dr. Jonathan Fogle, Dan Bogan
c Cullen Laboratory, Dr. John Cullen, Sashi Gadi

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Flow Cytometry and Cell Sorting Laboratory, Dr. Jonathan Fogle, Sarah Bianco
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Gnotobiotic Animal Core of Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, Dr. Susan Tonkonogy, Ashley Weaver

Under the direction of Dr. Susan Tonkonogy theGnotobiotic Animal Core of the Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease is one of the Core facilities of the Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease. The Center is funded by NIH to support research in gastrointestinal biology at UNC-Chapel Hill and North Carolina State University. The Gnotobiotic Animal Core, which maintains germ-free and gnotobiotic rodents, is housed in the Laboratory Animal Resources facility at the College of Veterinary Medicine. My current research focuses on cytokine mediated regulation of immunity and inflammation in the intestinal tract. Our studies are designed to determine how the intestinal immune response is involved in initiation and perpetuation of chronic intestinal inflammation that occurs in human inflammatory bowel disease.

 

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Hammerberg Laboratory, Dr. Bruce Hammerberg, Sitka Eguiluz-Hernandez

h Histology Laboratory, Dr. John Cullen, Sandra Horton
m Intestinal Stress Pathophysiology Laboratory, Dr. Adam Moeser, Laura Edwards
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Luff Laboratory, Dr. Jennifer Luff, Michelle Mader

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Mycoplasma Diagnostic and Research Laboratory (MDRL), Dr. David Ley, Sile Huyan

Research in my laboratory is focused on improving the health of commercial poultry by developing new knowledge that will contribute to the elimination or reduction of losses due to mycoplasmosis. Specific objectives are to 1) develop and evaluate rapid diagnostic capabilities for the identification of Mycoplasma species and strains causing diseases, 2) to delineate the epidemiology of avian mycoplasmosis by developing and using strain-specific molecular markers and gene sequencing, and 3) to study the dynamics of Mycoplasma gallisepticum conjunctivitis in songbirds from emergence to endemicity.

s Orndorff Lab, Dr. Paul Orndorff, Patty Spears
l Parasitology Lab, Dr. Mike Levy, Kay Gore
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Ruminant Medicine and GI Physiology Laboratory, Dr. Derek Foster, Hannah Sylvester

We are focused on the impact of gastrointestinal physiology on 3 key areas of ruminant health: gastrointestinal pathogens, absorption of colostral antibodies, and antimicrobial efficacy and resistance. In collaboration with Drs. Megan Jacob and Geof Smith, we are interested in the pathogenesis, epidemiology, and control of gastrointestinal pathogens including Shiga-toxin producing E. coli, Salmonella, and Cryptosporidium parum. A second goal is to understand the mechanisms of colostral antibody absorption in calves to identify genetic influences on the process, better formulate colostrum replacers, and assess novel methods of colostrum pasteurization. The final area of interest is in collaboration with Dr. Mark Papich to develop new methods to assess antimicrobial concentrations at the site of action to evaluate drug efficacy, and in the intestine to mitigate the risk of development of antimicrobial resistant pathogens.

l Shive Laboratory, Dr. Heather Shive, Mandy Cass
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Swine Health and Production Medicine Laboratory, Dr. Glen Almond, Patty Routh

Our research has focused on reproductive physiology, urogenital disease and interactions between disease, pathogens and growth. Current research studies are targeted to improving our understanding of the immune response to PRRSV and will soon include studies on PEDv.

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Thakur Molecular Epidemiology Laboratory, Dr. Sid Thakur, Amanda Hardison

We espouse the concepts of "One Health" in working towards reducing the burden of antimicrobial resistant bacterial pathogens in animals, humans and the environment. We use the "Farm to Genome" approach to study antimicrobial resistance by identifying selection pressures, discovering mechanisms of resistance, understanding environmental role in transmission and using phylogenetics to study population evolution that impacts the diversity of these resistant bacterial strains

Diagnostic Testing Services

 

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g Clinical Immunology Laboratory, Dr. Jonathan Fogle, Linda English
j Clinical Microbiology Laboratory, Dr. Megan Jacob, Anna Rogers
l Clinical Pathology Laboratory, Dr. Carol Grindem, Dr. Jennifer Neel, Cheri Eller
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Clinical Virology Laboratory, Dr. James Guy, Melissa Byrd, Leah Scarborough

The NCSU CVM Clinical Virology Laboratory provides virology diagnostic services to clients of the CVM Veterinary Health Complex, North Carolina veterinarians, and food animal industries located in North Carolina and surrounding states. The laboratory provides virologic testing services for a broad range of species; however, services are primarily oriented toward dogs, cats, horses, swine and poultry. The laboratory is a reference laboratory for detection of turkey coronavirus infection in turkeys (ELISA serology, PCR detection), and provides these services to producers in eight states. The laboratory also provides specialized services for diagnosis of chicken proventricular necrosis virus, the causative agent of transmissible viral proventriculitis in chickens.

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Flow Cytometry and Cell Sorting Laboratory, Dr. Jonathan Fogle, Sarah Bianco

h Histology Laboratory, Dr. John Cullen, Sandra Horton
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Mycoplasma Diagnostic and Research Laboratory (MDRL), Dr. David Ley, Sile Huyan

Research in my laboratory is focused on improving the health of commercial poultry by developing new knowledge that will contribute to the elimination or reduction of losses due to mycoplasmosis. Specific objectives are to 1) develop and evaluate rapid diagnostic capabilities for the identification of Mycoplasma species and strains causing diseases, 2) to delineate the epidemiology of avian mycoplasmosis by developing and using strain-specific molecular markers and gene sequencing, and 3) to study the dynamics of Mycoplasma gallisepticum conjunctivitis in songbirds from emergence to endemicity.

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Poultry Health Services Laboratory (PHSL), Dr. Michael Martin, Jennifer Strickland

The Avian Health Services and Research Laboratory (AHSRL) is dedicated to the support of the poultry industry and provides pertinent diagnostics to evaluate avian health issues. The laboratory provides a wide range of diagnostic services directly to the poultry industry including serology, microbiology, fecal evaluation, and histopathology. The AHSRL also provides diagnostic services that support the clinical work of the Poultry Health Management (PHM) team. Our PHM team makes well over 100 field visits per year to a wide range of sites including broilers, turkeys, layers, niche, and hobby flock at the breeder, hatchery, feed mill, grow out, and processing levels.

g Poultry Tumor Disease Laboratory (PTDL), Dr. Isabel Gimeno, Lucia Cortes
a Ruminant Mastitis Laboratory, Dr. Kevin Anderson, Roberta Lyman
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Vector Borne Disease Laboratory, Dr. Mike Levy


Teaching

 

Courses Offered by the PHP Department
Selectives Offered by the PHP Department

a

Dr. Glen Almond

f

Dr. Derek Foster

mDr. Michael Martin

b

Dr. Luke Borst

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Dr. Derek Foster