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Kevin Anderson, DVM, PhD

Kevin Anderson

Ruminant Health and
Production
Medicine
Professor

Office: D-261, CVM Main Building
Phone: 919.513.6245
Fax: 919.513.6464
Email: kevin_anderson@ncsu.edu

 


Course Involvement

Veterinary Courses

  • VMP 916: Goat Production Cycle and Physical Examination Procedures
  • VMP 936: Sheep Production Cycle and Physical Examination Procedures
  • VMP 936: Mastitis Detection, Therapy and Control
  • VMP 956: Pregnancy Detection (Ultrasound) in Small Ruminants
  • VMP 956: Small and Large Ruminant Section
  • VMP 962: Ruminant Medicine and Surgery, Course Faculty
  • VMP 970: Ruminant Health Management I
  • VMP 972: Ruminant Health Management II
  • VMP 974: Food Supply Veterinary Medicine
  • VMP 987: Ruminant Special Topics
  • VMF 991(101): Milk Quality for Veterinary Professionals
  • VMP 992(108): Small Ruminant Clinical Experience

Graduate Courses

  • FSA 520A: Pre-Harvest Food Safety

Undergraduate Courses

  • VMP 420: Diseases of Farm Animals

Education/Training

  • DVM, University of Minnesota
  • MS, Veterinary Clinical Medicine, University of Illinois
  • PhD, Veterinary Pathobiology, University of Illinois
  • Board Certification: Diplomate, American Board of Veterinary Practitioners (Dairy Specialty)

Interests and Activities

My clinical, teaching and research efforts are focused on Ruminant Health Management.  Broadly, this includes ruminant medicine and infectious diseases, with specific interests in dairy cattle and small ruminants.    A major commitment is to mastitis and milk quality in ruminants.   My laboratory is the Mastitis and Milk Quality Laboratory, which has multiple missions.   These include teaching, service to veterinarians and producers, and research.   The laboratory supports clinical problem-solving related to mastitis and milk quality problems.

Research Area

Broad interest:  Ruminant Health Management, with specific interests in mastitis and milk quality, ruminant infectious diseases, ruminant metabolic diseases and small ruminants. 

Program focus:  Mastitis and milk quality

  1. Detection, pathophysiology and management (diagnosis, therapy) of mastitis in ruminant species.
  2. Improving the quality of milk in ruminant species.
  3. Mitigating food safety concerns in milk from microbiological or chemical contamination.
  4. Mastitis occurrence on organic dairies and alternative therapies for mastitis.

Research Synopsis

1. Detection, pathophysiology and management of mastitis in ruminant species.

a. Investigation of the molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus mastitis in dairy herds.  A recent publication demonstrated that horn flies on dairy herds carried the same pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) genotype of Staphylococcus aureus that was found causing intramammary infections in herd heifers and cows.  Another study demonstrated that a given PFGE genotype of Staphylococcus aureus could persist as a cause of mastitis on a specific dairy for many years.

  • Anderson KL, R Lyman, K Moury, D Ray, DW Watson, MT Correa. Molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus mastitis in dairy heifers. J Dairy Sci 2012/95/4921-4913.
  • Anderson KL,  RL Lyman. Long-term persistence of specific genetic types of mastitis-causing Staphylococcus aureus on three dairies. J Dairy Sci 2006/80/4551-4556.

b. Collaboration with a Research Triangle Park start-up company in development and evaluation of an automated method to perform a rapid milk differential cell count.   The method has been assessed in terms of its ability to detect quarters with intramammary infections by major and minor pathogens, as well as to serve as an indicator of subsequent milk production.

  • Anderson KL, MT Correa, A Allen and RR Rodriguez. Fresh cow mastitis monitoring on day 3 postpartum and its relationship to subsequent milk production. J Dairy Sci 2010/93/5673-5683.
  • Anderson KL, RR Rodriguez, D Asion, J Wilder, A Krebs.  An easy technique for milk differential cell counts.  III Panamerican Congress on Mastitis Control and Milk Quality.  March 27-30, 2006, Fiesta American Hotel, Leon, Guanajuato, Mexico, pp. 185-196.

c. Investigation of drug strategies in therapy of mastitis.  Early work established the pharmacokinetics of and effects of use of flunixin meglumine in an endotoxin-induced model of bovine mastitis.   Flunixin meglumine is commonly used for therapy for more serious cases of bovine mastitis.

  • Smith G.W., R.L. Lyman, K.L. Anderson. Efficacy of vaccination and antimicrobial treatment to eliminate chronic intramammary Staphylococcus aureus infection in dairy cattle. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2006/228 (3)/422-425.
  • Anderson, K.L. , E. Hunt, and B.J. Davis. The influence of anti-inflammatory therapy on bacterial clearance following Escherichia coli challenge in goats. Vet Res Comm 1991/15/147-161.
  • Anderson, K.L. , C.A. Neff, Davis, L.E. Davis, and V.D. Bass. Pharmacokinetics of flunixin meglumine in lactating cattle after single and multiple intramuscular and intravenous administrations. Am J Vet Res 1990/51/1464-1467.
  • Anderson, K.L. , A.R. Smith, R.D. Shanks, L.E. Davis. and B.K. Gustafsson Efficacy of flunixin meglumine for the treatment of endotoxin induced bovine mastitis. Am J Vet Res 1986/47/1366-1372.

2. Improving the quality of milk in the ruminant species.

a.  The unique challenge of managing Somatic Cell Counts in southeast dairy herds was recently investigated.

  • Anderson KL, E Wemple, K Ingawa, M Correa, R Lyman, K Mullen. Milk somatic cell counts in Southeast dairy herds.  ADSA Southern Section Symposium: Strategies for Managing Reproduction and Udder Health in Heat-Stressed Dairy Cows.  Joint Animal Meeting, Indianapolis,   Indiana, July 8-12, 2013.  American Dairy Science Association/American Society of Animal Science http://www.jtmtg.org/JAM/2013/abstracts/2013-JAM-Abstracts.pdfJ. Dairy Sci. 96(E-Suppl. 1)/Abstract 608/ p. 643.

b. Strategies to control mastitis by contagious pathogens have been investigated.

  •   RO Azizoglu, R Lyman, KL Anderson. Bovine Staphylococcus aureus: Dose response to iodine and chlorhexidine and effect of iodine challenge on antibiotic susceptibility. J Dairy Sci 96(2)/2013/993-999. http://dx.doi.org.prox.lib.ncsu.edu/10.3168/jds.2012-5857.
  • Anderson, KL., R.L. Lyman, S.M. Bodeis-Jones, D.G. White. Genetic diversity and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles among mastitis-causing staphylococcus aureus isolated from bovine milk samples. AMJVestRes 2006/67 (7) / 1185-1191.
  • DeGraves, F.J. and K.L.  Anderson. Ibuprofen treatment of endotoxin-induced bovine mastitis. Am J Vet Res 1993/54/1128-1132.

3. Mitigating food safety concerns in milk from microbiological or chemical contamination

a. Several studies have involved measuring adulterants in milk. 

  • Musser J.M.B., K.L. Anderson, J.O Boison. Tissue disposition and depletion of penicillin G after oral administration with milk in unweaned dairy calves. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001/219 (3)/346-350.
  • Musser J.M.B., K.L. Anderson. Bioavailability and disposition of sodium and procaine penicillin G (benzylpenicillin ) administered orally with milk to calves. J Vet Pharmol Therap 2001/241/161-169.
  • Anderson, K.L. , W.A. Moats, J.E. Rushing, D.P. Wesen, and M.G. Papich. Potential of oxytetracycline administration by three routes to cause milk residues in lactating cows, as detected by radioimmunoassay (Charm II) and high-performance liquid chromatography test methods. Am J Vet Res 1995/56/70-77.
  • Anderson, K.L. , W.A. Moats, J.E. Rushing, D.P. Wesen, and M.G. Papich. Potential of oxytetracycline administration by three routes to cause milk residues in lactating cows, as detected by radioimmunoassay (Charm II) and high-performance liquid chromatography test methods. Am J Vet Res 1995/56/70-77.

b. Food safety concerns related to milk have been investigated.

  • Ferreira, JP, MT Correa, R Lyman, KL Anderson. A review of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in dairy cattle. The Bovine Practitioner. 2012/46(1)/1-9.
  • Ferreira, J.P., K.L. Anderson, M.T. Correa, R. Lyman, F. Ruffin, L.B. Reller, and V.G. Fowler. Transmission of MRSA between companion animals and infected human patients. PLoS One. 2011/6(11), e26978.
  • MacDonald, P.D.M., R.E. Whitwam, J.D. Boggs, J.N. MacCormack, K.L.  Anderson, J.W. Reardon, J.R. Saah, L.M. Graves, S.B. Hunter, J. Sobel.  Outbreak of listeriosis among Mexican immigrants as a result of consumption of illicitly produced Mexican-style cheese. Clin Infec Dis 2005/40/672-682. 
  • Anderson, K.L., W.A. Moats, J.E. Rushing, and J. O'Carroll. Detection of milk antibiotic residues by use of screening tests and liquid chromatography after intramammary administration of amoxicillin or penicillin G in cows with clinical mastitis. Am J Vet Res 1998/59 (9)/1096-1100.
  • Musser, J.M.B., K.L. Anderson, and K.L. Tyczkowska. Pharmacokinetic parameters and milk concentrations of ketoprofen after administration as a single intravenous bolus dose to lactating goats. J Vet Pharmacol Ther 1998/21 (5)/358-363.

4. Mastitis occurrence in organic dairy herds and the use of essential oils in therapy have been addressed.

Selected Publications