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Graduate Course Listing

 

CBS 565 - Fundamentals of Biomedical Science (3 credits)

Introductory course for students interested in gaining a broad understanding of: comparative genomics, comparative immunology, comparative physiology, pharmacokinetics, emerging zoonotic diseases, epidemiology and translational research models and methods. This course also provides an overview of current technologies relevant to comparative biomedical research and a foundation for implementing the scientific method (e.g. experimental design, data analyses, statistics). Priority will be given to first-year students in CBS graduate program; Enrollment of all students requires consent of instructor.

CBS 570 - Methods of Biomedical Science (1 credit)

Introductory course for students interested in gaining a broad understanding of various laboratory methods used in molecular, cellular and "omics" based biomedical research.

CBS 595/795 - Special Topics in General Pathology (3 credits)

This course is an introduction to the basic pathologic changes that occur in animal tissues. Inflammation, tissue injury, cancer and the resulting morphology observed at gross, cellular, and the subcellular level will be emphasized. The molecular mechanisms of these processes will be highlighted.

CBS 595/795 Special Topics in Avian Pathology (3 credits)

Changes in tissue from healthy and diseased birds, including poultry, companion, zoological, and free living species will be covered by system and etiology. Emphasis will be on identification of lesions and their interpretation as a means of obtaining a diagnosis or studying fundamental aspects of avian health.

CBS 610/810 Special Topics in Theriogenology I (2 credits)

Students will meet weekly to review current literature and discuss a wide range of topics surrounding animal reproduction, including comparative physiology and endocrinology, reproductive management, reproductive diseases and pharmacologic/technologic advances in Theriogenology. Each student will be expected to actively participate in group discussions and present 1-3 seminars during the semester.

CBS 610/810 Special Topics in Theriogenology II (1 credit)

Students will explore pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of major reproductive diseases through a series of bimonthly seminars. Students will be assigned one topic/seminar to summarize in ~20 min presentations. Each seminar will be comprised of several presentations on related conditions, with time for discussion throughout. Students will be encouraged to explore current research or review articles to discuss the most recent developments in diagnosis and treatment of reproductive disorders. Articles should be evaluated for quality, novelty of findings, and clinical applications of the information presented.

CBS 610 One Health Dialogues (1 credit)

Students must be concurrently enrolled in either CBS 586 or CBS 786 (currently CBS 886) to enroll for this optional one credit, interactive discussion group. The class will video conference with students and faculty from UNC-CH and Duke, Wednesdays 8:30 - 9:30AM, to discuss the previous night's CBS 586/786 (886)presentations and assigned readings in greater depth; discuss current stories in the news related to One Health; and give a short presentation on their research papers for CBS 586/786 so students can benefit from each others' endeavors.

CBS 662 Professional Conduct in Biomedical Research (1 credit)

Plagiarism, authorship, fraud, safety, sexual harassment, IACUC, consulting agreements, serving as an expert witness, contacting elected officials, working with press, human subjects committee, and related topics.

CBS 732 Light and Electron Microscopy: Principles and Practice (5 credits)

Principles and applications of various tools for the optical visualization of cells and tissues, with information about how to best ascertain structure-function relationships. Introduction to sample preparation for light and electron microscopy, microtomy, and the theory and utilization of transmission-and scanning electron microscopes, light microscopes and confocal laser scanning microscopes. In addition, cytochemistry, cryotechniques, immunocytochemistry, digital imaging techniques, telemedicine, and silver-based photography techniques will be covered. Prerequisite: Graduate standing

CBS 754 Principles of Analytical Epidemiology (3 credits)

Principles of epidemiology related to investigation of disease involving agent-host-environment concepts. Stress on epidemiological techniques and experimental design. Main focus on descriptive, analytical and experimental epidemiology pertinent to disease etiology and prevention. Prerequisite: Graduate standing

CBS 762 Principles of Pharmacology (3 credits)

The action of drugs in animals and man including basic principles of drug disposition, pharmacokinetics, drug resistance, and signal transduction. Modification of physiological processes by drugs influencing nervous, renal, cardiovascular, and endocrine systems and the antimicrobic and antineoplastics agents.

CBS/PHY 764 - Advances in Gastrointestinal Pathophysiology (3 credits)

This course will focus on advanced gastrointestinal physiology and the pathophysiology of deseases of relevance to scientsts involved in animal-related research. In particular, the course will cover the pathophysiology of ulceration, infectious diarrhea, ischemia, motility disorders, and inflammatory diseases of the gut. An in-depth review paper will be required based on recent literature rgarding a specific gastrointestinal disease. Prerequisite: PHY 503, PHY 504

CBS 770 Cell Biology (3 credits)

Advanced cell and organelle structure and function and recent advances in molecular biology. Emphasis on current literature and application of research procedures. Prerequisites: BCH 451 (Biochemistry), BIO 183 (Introductory Biology, CH 223 (Organic Chemistry)

CBS/TOX 771 - Cancer Biology (4 credits)

A comprehensive graduate course focusing on the molecular and cellular bases of cancer. Targets of oncogenic mutations will be discussed as well as their impact on cell proliferation, cell survival, and the invasion of normal tissues by tumorigeniccells. State-of-the-art technologies to detect oncogenic mutations and characterize transformed cells will be discussed as well as therapeutic strategies for the rational treatment of cancer. Prerequisite: CBS 770

CBS 790 - Special Topics in Clinical Pathology (1-3 credits)

New, fundamental and in-depth understanding of selected topics in clinical pathology (blood coagulation, acid-base balance, hematology, cytology, and clinical chemistry). A new topic selected each semester. Students read pertinent current journal articles and references and lead weekly discussion sessions. Stress upon clinical spplication of this information.

CBS 800 - Seminar in Comparative Biomedical Sciences (1 credit)

Presentation and discussions on ongoing research and current topics in biomedical sciences.

CBS 803 - Seminar in Surgical Pathology (1 credit)

Description and interpretation of microscopic changes in tissues from diseased domestic and laboratory animals. Students attend and participate in a one-hour weekly seminar where microscopic lesions described, interpreted and discussed.

CBS 804 - Seminar in Necropsy Pathology (1 credit)

Description and interpretation of gross changes in tissues from diseased domestic animals. Students attend daily (M-F) 15-to 30-minute review of necropsy lesions presented by a member of the graduate staff.

CBS 810 Special Topics/ Pathology Seminar (1 credit)

Designed to present new or special subject matter within the scope of Pathology. The studies may include independent investigations, seminars and/or formal lectures.

CBS 810 Special Topics/ Cell Biology Seminar (1 credit)

Designed to present new or special subject matter within the scope of Cell Biology. The studies may include independent investigations, seminars and/or formal lectures.

CBS 810 Special Topics/ Comparative Medicine & Translational Research (1 credit)

Designed to present new or special subject matter within the scope of Comparative Medicine and Translational Research. The studies may include independent investigations, seminars and/or formal lectures.

CBS 810 Special Topics/ Pharmacology Seminar (1 credit)

Designed to present new or special subject matter within the scope of pharmacology. The studies may include independent investigations, seminars and/or formal lectures.

CBS 810 Special Topics/ Population Medicine Seminar(1 credit)

Designed to present new or special subject matter within the scope of population medicine. The studies may include independent investigations, seminars and/or formal lectures.

CBS 812 Special Topics in Pathology (1 credit)

Specific topics of study assigned in various laboratories involved in veterinary microbiology investigation. Students conduct in-dept studies of assigned problem areas.

CBS/IMM 816 Advanced Topics in Immunology (1 credit)

Selected topics of current interest in immunology. A different topic will be covered each semester to focus on the most recent developments in the field.

CBS 817 Advanced Topics in Zoological Medicine I (2 credits)

Selected topics of current interest in clinical zoological medicine focused on marine mammals, fish, reptiles, amphibians, waterfowl, ratites, raptors and medical issues in free-ranging wildlife. Review of current clinical and basic science literature, student-lead discussion sessions and participation in faculty-lead discussions.

CBS 886 One Health: From Philosophy to Practice (2 credits)

Graduate/professional seminar (with team project) addressing intersections of veterinary medicine, human medicine, and environmental health. Co-listed at UNC CH Gillings School of Global Public Health and Duke University School of Medicine. Includes participants from these three institutions, plus related private-sector members, non-governmental organizations, and government professionals. Its purpose is to facilitate understanding of one health as a system of systems, and promote cross-campus and cross-discipline interactions. Weekly evening course held at NC Biotechnology Center, RTP.

FW 720 Epidemiology of Wildlife Disease (3 credits)

Concepts related to infectious disease outbreaks in free-ranging species of wildlife. Numerous examples of wildlife diseases will be used to illustrate factors affecting host-agent-environment interactions in fish, amphibians, birds, and both aquatic and terrestrial mammals. Enrollment in the Fisheries and Wildlife graduate program or Masters of Veterinary Public Health program; clinical residents or veterinary students at the College of Veterinary Medicine.

FW 730 Ethics in Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences (2 credits)

Students will explore historical and current thinking concerning the search for truth about natural systems, and the complex ethics scientists and practitioners who operate in the public sector must consider. Standards of professional and ethical behavior specific to Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences will be addressed. Faculty will introduce topics and guide discussions; students will give seminars and lead some discussions. For doctoral students in Fisheries, Wildlife and Conservation Biology.

IMM 751 Immunology (3 credits)

Introduction to mechanisms of immunity in man and animals. Emphasis on interactions between cells of the immune system in production of immune responses and the molecules in control of these interactions.
Prerequisite: BCH 451, GN 411, MB 351

IMM 755 Immunoparasitology (2 credits)

Helminth and protozoal parasite immune evasion and immunomodulation; consequences of parasite-induced immunopathogenesis; learning from failed attempts to develop protective vaccines against protozoa and helminths. Prerequisite: MB 751

IMM 757 Comparative Immunology (3 credits)

Compare and contrast the immune system structure and function of animal species of agricultural and veterinary significance with that of humans and traditional biomedical model organisms. Discuss key evolutionary differences, how different species use different mechanisms to achieve the same outcomes, and the clinical implications for these differences.
Prerequisite: MB 751 or MB 441 or BIO 414

IMM 816 Advanced Topics in Immunology (1 credit)

Selected topics of current interest in immunology. A different topic will be covered each semester to focus on the most recent developments in the field.

PHY 620/820 Special Problems in Physiology/Gastrointestinal Pathophysiology (1 credit)

PHY/CBS 764 - Advances in Gastrointestinal Pathophysiology (3 credits)

This course will focus on advanced gastrointestinal physiology and the pathophysiology of deseases of relevance to scientsts involved in animal-related research. In particular, the course will cover the pathophysiology of ulceration, infectious diarrhea, ischemia, motility disorders, and inflammatory diseases of the gut. An in-depth review paper will be required based on recent literature rgarding a specific gastrointestinal disease. Prerequisite: PHY 503, PHY 504

VPH 554 Trade and Agriculture Health (2 credits)

This course is designed for agriculture and food safety specialists, veterinarians, and epidemiologists interested in learning about international trade and agricultural health. WTO/SPS affect all aspects of agricultural health including production,food security, public health, tourism and the environment. This introductory course will review SPS articles, GATT provisions, the associations between WTO and public health, the work of the OIE, CAC, and IPPC; the impact of TRIPS and anti-dumping measures. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, Upper Class Undergraduate standing

VPH 650 Population Medicine Forum (1 credit)

Population medicine forum is a seminar-based class during which current topics in population health are presented and discussed. Topics covered include: Outbreak investigation, observational epidemiologic research, risk analysis, spatial analysis, the application of unique diagnostic technologies and epidemiologic modeling.

SVM 615 Advanced Animal Production Topics/ Turkey Production (1 credit)

Students will be provided with practice and experience in advanced topics related to management of production animals with an emphasis on the veterinary aspects of population health. Actual in-the-field, hands-on practice and investigation of relevant literature will provide the basis for study of advanced animal production topics.