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Dr. Kennedy-Stoskopf named Outstanding Woman Veterinarian

The Association for Women Veterinarians has named Suzanne Kennedy-Stoskopf as the Outstanding Woman Veterinarian of the Year.

Dr. Kennedy-Stoskopf is recognized for her contributions to practice, research, and teaching during her 30 years as a veterinarian. A research professor in both the Department of Population Health and Pathobiology and the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at NC State University, her research and clinical interests include zoological medicine, the impacts of environmental factors on immune function and disease expression in wildlife populations, and the health management of wild felids.

Dr. James Floyd, head of the Department of Population Health and Pathobiology, highlighted Dr. Kennedy-Stoskopf’s accomplishments in a nominating letter. In part, he wrote: “In this past year alone she has contributed significantly as a national leader providing guidance and leadership as the chairperson of the American Board of Veterinary Specialities. . .and has made numerous contributions to the key professional organizations focused on wildlife health in the U.S. and abroad. She is a nationally and internationally respected researcher, teacher, and mentor.”

The letter continued by noting that Dr. Kennedy-Stoskopf was the first woman veterinarian at the National Zoo and the first fulltime, female faculty member specializing in zoological medicine in North America. She organized the zoological medicine program at the University of Tennessee CVM. These firsts earned her a US Postal Service First Day Cover in the Women’s History Series. She then obtained a PhD in immunology and infectious diseases at Johns Hopkins and held faculty appointments in the School of Medicine at Johns Hopkins and the Basel Institute for Immunology.

In 1989, Dr. Kennedy-Stoskopf joined the NC State CVM faculty and co-founded and directed the country’s first three-year residency in zoological medicine that has served as a national model. She continues to develop the CVM environmental and zoological medicine programs, and mentors students entering the profession.

Posted February 7, 2007