skip to main content, skip to Quick links, or skip to Search

main content

David Bristol Appointed Associate Dean of Enterprise Development

Dr. Paul Lunn, Dean of the NC State University College of Veterinary Medicine, has appointed Dr. David Bristol to the newly created role of Associate Dean for Enterprise Development, a cabinet-level position that will help identify and develop new initiatives related to the CVM education, research, and engagement missions and the continued development of the Centennial Biomedical Campus.

The appointment will be effective July, 2013 upon Dr. Bristol’s return to the CVM from his American Council on Education (ACE) Fellowship training.

“We are fortunate to call upon Dr. Bristol who is uniquely qualified for this important role,” says Dean Lunn. “He has years of experience in the most senior administrative roles in the College, as well as his advanced training as an ACE Fellow working with Ohio State University President Dr. E. Gordon Gee. As Associate Dean for Enterprise Development, Dr. Bristol’s responsibilities will be to identify projects that offer key strategic advantages for the College, and which can be advanced more effectively and efficiently with his personal attention.”

Dr. David Bristol Dr. Bristol joined the NC State CVM as an assistant professor of surgery in 1984; three years after the College’s first DVM students were admitted. He became an associate dean and director of academic affairs in 1995, and served as the CVM interim dean from 2009 to 2012.

A Diplomate of both the American College of Veterinary Surgeons and the American Board of Veterinary Practitioners, Equine, Dr. Bristol began a term as an American Council of Education Fellow earlier this year. The ACE Fellows Program strengthens American higher education by preparing senior faculty members and administrators for executive leadership positions in colleges and universities.

Dr. Bristol was named "Veterinarian of the Year" for 2010 by the North Carolina Veterinary Medical Association for his "outstanding contributions to veterinary medicine."

Posted Nov. 7, 2012