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Ophthalmology

Contact Information

Phone: 919.513.6659
Fax:     919.513.6711
Email:   vhcophthalmology@ncsu.edu
Hours: The Ophthalmology service receives elective cases 9:30AM-3:30PM Monday, Tuesday and Thursday by appointment. We perform elective surgery on Wednesday and Friday. We also make small animal and large animal appointments (through the VHC) twice a month at our satellite clinic at the Equine Health Center in Southern Pines, NC.

The Small Animal and Equine Ophthalmology services are available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year for treatment of emergency problems. To make a referral on an emergency basis, call 919.513.6659 or 919.513.6911. Referring Veterinarians can also call for consults at anytime.

General Information

The Terry Center

red Cross Cadeceus

Emergency Service

Main Number: 919.513.6500
Small Animal Emergency: 919.513.6911
Large Animal Emergency: 919.513.6630
Hours:
Monday-Thursday 5PM-8AM
Friday 5PM-Monday 8AM

Open 24 hours on legal holidays.
No appointment needed.

Ophthalmology - Special Services, Technology, & Information

Entropion

Entropion is a conformational defect resulting in “in-rolling” of one or more of the eyelids, which causes ocular irritation.

Developmental or conformational entropion is a rolling in of the eyelid margin of one or more lids. Other forms of entropion are spastic entropion, which occurs secondary to ocular pain, and cicatricial entropion, a result of eyelid scarring. All of these conditions result in contact of the eyelashes with the corneal surface. The irritation is very painful and may lead to a corneal ulcer. Diagnosis is made upon clinical examination.

Clinical signs may include tearing, conjunctivitis, and keratitis with or without corneal ulceration. Decreased vision may result from constant eyelid closure or associated corneal opacities.

Entropion is commonly seen in Shar-Peis, Chow-Chows, Rottweilers, Great Danes, Labrador Retrievers, and English Bulldogs. When entropion occurs in young animals, eyelid tacking is used to temporarily evert (turn out) the eyelids. Eyelid tacking is used extensively in puppies with conformational entropion. If necessary, eyelid-tacking procedures may be repeated in young dogs until they reach their full size. Many puppies simply need to “grow into” their eyelids. Tacking may also be used in adult animals for relief of pain associated with spastic entropion. Following eyelid tacking, standard care includes an Elizabethan collar. Sutures are generally left in place for 2-3 weeks.

Surgical Correction

Chronic or recurring entropion requires surgical correction. The most common surgical procedure is called the Hotz-Celsus procedure which involves removal of a crescent of skin from the affected eyelid. This area is then sutured closed, causing the eyelid to revert to a normal position. Some dogs require multiple surgical corrections.

Following entropion surgery, eyelid swelling should be minimal and usually resolves within 48 hrs. Postoperative care includes an Elizabethan collar and daily topical antibiotics. Sutures are generally left in place for 10 days.